To give you an example, our domain authority is currently a mediocre 41 due to not putting a lot of emphasis on it in the past. For that reason, we want to (almost) automatically scratch off any keyword with a difficulty higher than 70%—we just can’t rank today. Even the 60% range as a starting point is gutsy, but it’s achievable if the content is good enough.
Moreover: if you don’t have to, don’t change your URLs. Even if your URLs aren’t “pretty,” if you don’t feel as though they’re negatively impacting users and your business in general, don’t change them to be more keyword focused for “better SEO.” If you do have to change your URL structure, make sure to use the proper (301 permanent) type of redirect. This is a common mistake businesses make when they redesign their websites.
You can’t mention Dallas sporting events without talking about the Dallas Cowboys, often referred to as “America’s Team.”  The Cowboys are considered to be the second most valuable sports franchise in the world, and when in Dallas, you definitely shouldn’t pass up the chance to take in a game at the aptly named Cowboys Stadium. If you go to a game, don’t forget to get the hottest fashion advice in Dallas. Although the Cowboys actually play their home games in nearby Arlington, Texas, it is only a short drive from Dallas, and is one thing to do in Dallas that you shouldn’t miss.
Thick & Unique Content – There is no magic number in terms of word count, and if you have a few pages of content on your site with a handful to a couple hundred words you won’t be falling out of Google’s good graces, but in general recent Panda updates in particular favor longer, unique content. If you have a large number (think thousands) of extremely short (50-200 words of content) pages or lots of duplicated content where nothing changes but the page’s title tag and say a line of text, that could get you in trouble. Look at the entirety of your site: are a large percentage of your pages thin, duplicated and low value? If so, try to identify a way to “thicken” those pages, or check your analytics to see how much traffic they’re getting, and simply exclude them (using a noindex meta tag) from search results to keep from having it appear to Google that you’re trying to flood their index with lots of low value pages in an attempt to have them rank.

Banner exchange is one of the most popular free promotion tools today. You can drive a decent amount of traffic to your site for free. Display other site's ads on your site and they display yours. They are easy to use, just paste a relative HTML code (given to you by banner exchange program) into your web site, and upload your banner to banner exchange. That's all - you are ready to go. The script will automatically run banners on your and other web sites.
I am new at this. I have been researching keywords and have found a few keyword phrases that nobody in the first page of Google results is even using in their Title Tag or H1 Tag. Some of the companies on the results page have a high pagerank and lots of backlinks. If I optimize for this exact keyword phrase with a new website, would I have much of a chance of getting on the first page eventually?
Here you are, all happy and proud at the fact that your business now has its own website. Everyone said that it would definitely boost your presence. Everyone said having your own website would surely be a reason to rake in more clients and customers who would turn into buyers. Everyone said it was going to be a huge improvement compared to the time when you still didn’t have your own website.
Essentially, what distinguishes direct from organic traffic today is tracking. According to Business2Community, direct traffic is composed of website visits which have “no referring source or tracking information.” A referring source can be a search engine, or it can be a link from another website. Direct traffic can include visits that result from typing the URL directly into a browser, as the simple definition suggests.
Excellent post Brian. I think the point about writing content that appeals to influencers in spot on. Could you recommend some good, manual strategies through which I can spot influencers in boring niches *B2B* where influencers are not really talking much online? Is it a good idea to rely on newspaper articles to a feel for what a particular industry is talking about? Would love to hear your thoughts on that.
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