Another excellent guide is Google’s “Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide.” This is a free PDF download that covers basic tips that Google provides to its own employees on how to get listed. You’ll find it here. Also well worth checking out is Moz’s “Beginner’s Guide To SEO,” which you’ll find here, and the SEO Success Pyramid from Small Business Search Marketing.
I feel I have great content…but most of it is within my email marketing campaign instead of my blogs. I’ve used my blogs to include links to my email marketing campaigns to lead to my product. In your opinion, should my blog content be the priority? I find my marketing emails sound more like a blog than just a “tip” or a reason to grab people to my list.
Thank you Brian for this great article! I enjoy reading it even though it took quite sometime of slow reading to sink all concept in and trying to remember them. For future reference, I also shared your article in my Facebook post so I can refer to and share with those who worked with me. I like the way you presented the details and its easy to read and understand.:)
Organic traffic is the primary channel that inbound marketing strives to increase. This traffic is defined as visitors coming from a search engine, such as Google or Bing. This does not include paid search ads, but that doesn’t mean that organic traffic isn’t impacted by paid search or display advertising, either positively or negatively. In general, people trust search engines, and sayings such as “just Google it” reinforce that humans are tied to the search engine. Thus, paid search, display, or even offline campaigns can drive searches, which may increase organic traffic while those campaigns are running.

Generating Organic Traffic is far from easy seeing you have to consistently update your blog with new and unique content. The less you update your blog the less your article pushes up in Google’s index. I would also suggest your Domain Name has a targeted keywords in it! So if someone is searching a set of keywords that are not only a topic title on your site but also a part of the domain name you have a really good chance of being displayed in Google’s Top Ten.
I’m not sure that’s natural link building/earning and I feel Google would have a problem with webmasters getting hundreds of links from different entities which were all identical? The websites embedding the images may not even know they are linking to you. Google in the past recommended these kinds of links are nofollow: https://searchengineland.com/googles-matt-cutts-i-recommend-nofollowing-links-on-widgets-169487

1. The big picture. Before you get started with individual tricks and tactics, take a step back and learn about the “big picture” of SEO. The goal of SEO is to optimize your site so that it ranks higher in searches relevant to your industry; there are many ways to do this, but almost everything boils down to improving your relevance and authority. Your relevance is a measure of how appropriate your content is for an incoming query (and can be tweaked with keyword selection and content creation), and your authority is a measure of how trustworthy Google views your site to be (which can be improved with inbound links, brand mentions, high-quality content, and solid UI metrics).
Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of websites and individual pages or sections within a site. This can be done by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the website – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the website can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the website.[2]
There are several web traffic referral sources. Organic traffic comes from search engines. Referral traffic comes from other websites. Display traffic comes from ads for your business on other sites. Paid traffic comes from promotions via sites like AdWords. Social traffic comes from social media sites. Each type of traffic can be further divided into individual traffic sources. For example, organic traffic can come from Google, Bing, or other search engines. And social traffic can come from a variety of sites.

Organic is different. Matching keywords to user intent means you may be present in many searches. The user may find you consistently, and once they get to your site, they are more likely to stay. Organic users are still your best long-term customers. In my experience, they have lower bounce rates and more pages visited, and they are more likely to return.


The first step that I take is to do a quick Google search to find pages on my domain where I've mentioned the keyword in question so that I can add an internal link. To do this, I'll use the following search query, replacing DOMAIN with your domain name (e.g. matthewbarby.com) and KEYWORD with the keyword you're targeting (e.g. "social media strategy"):
So just how much of the traffic that finds itself labeled as direct is actually organic? Groupon conducted an experiment to try to find out, according to Search Engine Land. They de-indexed their site for the better part of a day and looked at direct and organic traffic, by hour and by browser, to pages with long URLs, knowing that pages with shorter URLs actually do get a large amount of direct traffic, as they can be typed quickly and easily into a browser. The results showed a 50% drop in direct traffic, clearly demonstrating how all of these other factors come into play during the analytics process.
Get a FREE website traffic report for any domain, with unlimited access 24-7. Traffic Estimate has been providing a website traffic estimator, site rankings, and analytics since 2004. We strive to provide useful information for website owners, domain buyers, and SEO gurus. You can use our traffic estimator, check statistics, and monitor data on just about any domain. See how to drive more site traffic, track competitors, compare websites, view related keywords, and increase your web traffic footprint by using our SEO tools, stats, and partners.
would it be easier to set up 2 separate GMAIL Accounts with 2 separate analytics accounts for 2 different web sites? Or is it ok to use 1 GMAIL account to manage 2 sites under 1 Analytics accounts and just have 2 properties inside of it? Take into consideration that it’s a local business doing services (no store front) and might need Adwords etc. Also take into consideration Search console , not sure how it influences Analytics /sites verifications
"Facebook Facebook" Battle Of The Pages is one of the simplest ways you can compare your Facebook content against the competition and learn your Facebook's content overall rank. By submit your Facebook Pages into our "Battle Of The Pages" feature, you can learn what visitors like about your competitors and try to make your Facebook Pages better. It can help you understand what styles are more appealing to the visitors, and correct your content accordingly.
There are several web traffic referral sources. Organic traffic comes from search engines. Referral traffic comes from other websites. Display traffic comes from ads for your business on other sites. Paid traffic comes from promotions via sites like AdWords. Social traffic comes from social media sites. Each type of traffic can be further divided into individual traffic sources. For example, organic traffic can come from Google, Bing, or other search engines. And social traffic can come from a variety of sites.
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